China

Importers complain of careless couriers in China

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An express courier readies his packages in Shanghai, Nov. 13. (Photo/Xinhua)
An express courier readies his packages in Shanghai, Nov. 13. (Photo/Xinhua)

An express courier readies his packages in Shanghai, Nov. 13. (Photo/Xinhua)

The quality of Chinese logistics companies has become one of the greatest concerns of Taiwanese businesspeople when sending goods back and forth across the strait, as delivery personnel are rarely held directly responsible for the packages they carry, often leading to packages suffering or going missing en route.

The Xiamen-based iPort Group, which specializes in importing Taiwanese delicatessen products to China, reported having a lot of trouble with local logistics companies. Around 10% of iPort's customers filed complaints to the company, a ratio which is seen as high in the industry. The company ultimately teamed up with seven to eight logistics companies and within three years they had lowered the complaint rate to less than 2%.

Huang Qingyu, the owner of another Xiamen-based company that ships Taiwanese goods to China, said that no matter how careful she is with her merchandise, Chinese logistics companies still manage to break them. Huang once protected some bottles of soy sauce with inflatable airbags to send to Fuzhou from Xiamen, but upon arrival, five of the six bottles were broken.

Huang often ships kaoliang liquor but the bottles are often broken during transport, and the trucks smell of alcohol when the trunks are opened.

Huang Jo-hsu, a second-generation Taiwanese businessman based out of Xiamen, told of his own experience. "I had my elder brother send me several bottles of energy drink from Taipei. The package transited in Kinmen and Xiamen without any problem, but when I sent it to Tongan district about 20 kilometers from here, all of them broke! In Taiwan, if a courier damages a package by throwing it up in the air and catching it, he will be reprimanded, but in China they can even get away with stamping on them," said Huang.

References:

Huang Qingyu 黃清玉

Huang Jo-hsu 黃若詡

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